Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘Scotland’

Image

I now have a new and improved blog site! I’m self-hosting for more options. One of these is being able to use my .com name. Sadly, I’ve been unable to transfer all you lovely subscribers to my new site. I would love for you to continue following me on the new site. I apologize for the inconvenience of having to resign up.

Below is a link to the new site!

http://www.terrihalebooks.com

See you there!

Advertisements

Read Full Post »

SCN_0036

(Me, in 2002, in the Highlands near Inverness, Scotland, listening for a word from my ancestors. I had to wait three more years before they spoke up.)

It seems I’ve been spending a lot of time waiting lately. And I just have to say, many of the things I’m waiting for are good, or the possibility of good things anyway. Now I don’t want to complain, I really don’t mind waiting from time to time, but it’s a bit crazy for me right now. What do you mean? Glad you asked.

IMG_0471

(Stopped at Sonic to get my caffeine/sugar fix after a 24 hour fast for my PET Scan in February. PS: I was radioactive in this photo can you tell? Are my superpowers showing? I had my cape on just for the occasion.)

I had labs drawn last week in anticipation of my oncology appointment tomorrow. I’ve been waiting for three months since my last one to see if all is well…to see if I’m holding steady in my battle against cancer. This time around it was fairly easy on the front end. I just had blood drawn. No tests, no scopes, no scans, no…well you get the picture. I’m not so much in a battle right now, I’m waiting. And this is one time I don’t mind the wait! I’m hoping for healing or a new form of treatment that is less destructive to the rest of my body. This is the heavy one when it comes to waiting. It’s better from here on out. I promise.

Image

(Here he is! Dr. Livingstone at Stuart’s, Land Cruiser mechanic extraordinaire!)

I’m waiting for my sweet ride to get a makeover. Dr. Livingstone, my 1974 FJ40. I love him. He’s rough and rugged and has been known to rescue many a young man’s TRUCK out of the mud. Just sayin’. You all know who you are. He is right now in the greasy but loving hands of Stuart, my new mechanic. This will be worth the wait. In the meantime, I’m without wheels.

Image

(This is sitting atop my dad’s desk. Just wanted you to know I don’t keep a large current photo of myself atop my own desk.)

Then there are three very cool events I’m waiting on that have to do with The Stone Manor, my novel. I’ve entered it in two different writing contests for unpublished novels. The first is the Golden Claddagh Contest, of which my novel is a finalist in the Celtic category. Woohoo! The winner will be announced September 5th. Waiting! The second contest is The Catherine Toronto Romance Writers Contest. Finalists to be announced mid-late August. Waiting. And last but by no means least, I have submitted my manuscript to a NYC agent. She’s considering representing my work. No timeline on this one. Waiting!!!!!

IMG_0770

(Our container preparing to leave our German apartment for Texas. Bon Voyage! Or I should say Gute Reisen!)

Jim and I are moving from Munich to the Black Forest in Germany. We are also downsizing (if that can be possible) so we’ve shipped most of our personal belongings back to Texas, where we’ve taken an apartment near our daughter and her family. So at this very moment, much of our earthly things are in a container on a ship somewhere in the Atlantic Ocean. Wait! I didn’t word that quite right. Hopefully they’re not in the ocean literally, the ship is sailing ON the ocean. Does that sound better? I have seen pictures of freighters plodding through stormy seas, containers sliding off into the water. Not a pretty sight. Image be gone! The container should be here in about a month. Wait for it.

Image

(Isn’t he handsome? Well worth the wait!)

Finally, Jim has been in Germany without me for a month and will arrive back in Texas on our anniversary, in just a few short days. BEST ANNIVERSARY PRESENT EVER! Waiting!

I could go on, but I won’t. We all are waiting for one thing or another on any given day. Some of us wait expectantly, some excitedly, some with great fear and dread. The danger is always this, we’ll miss living in the moment, the here and now, while waiting for the future to get here. Each day is a gift. It comes and it goes and we can never, ever get it back. I don’t know what you’re waiting for, but I hope you don’t miss what’s right in front of you while you’re looking ahead. I’m writing these last words for my own benefit, really. I needed to hear them. What about you?

Read Full Post »

Image

(Saucy Mary’s Lodge, Kyleakin, Isle of Skye, Scotland. Photo by Jim Hale.)

In the first draft of my novel, my main character, Kathryn, arrives on the Isle of Skye and stops at Saucy Mary’s for some fish and chips. It’s one of the first places to eat once you cross over the bridge from the mainland. I loved the name, and I loved the story behind the name even more.

The feisty Norse Princess Mary married Findanus Mackinnon. He was Lord of the Isles around 900 AD. Local legend says she laid a chain between the mainland and the Isle of Skye to collect a toll from passing ships.

Image

(Castle Moil, aka Saucy Mary’s Castle, Kyleakin, Isle of Skye, Scotland. Photo by Jim Hale.)

As you cross the bridge from Kyle of Lochalsh to Kyleakin you can see the remains of her castle. There is a Hostel Guest Lodge that bears her name complete with a pub. It was here I had Kathryn stop to eat her first meal on Skye.

Because of this, I intended to do the same when my husband and I took our trip to the Isle of Skye in 2008. I was following the story line to see if what I’d written worked. After driving the long five hours from the Glasgow airport to the Isle of Skye, we were ready for dinner…fish and chips from Saucy Mary’s. We’d stopped at Loch Lomond and Glencoe along the way, and unfortunately, had a flat tire on our rental car just before reaching the Skye Bridge. It was twilight. It was also our first encounter with the tiny vampires of Scotland…also known as midges. Once my handy husband changed the tire, we were off to the Misty Isle. I was so excited! After several years of writing and research I was finally going to experience Skye for myself. And search for my long lost ancestors…the Macdonalds!

As we rounded the final bend in the road, Skye came into view. I screamed, followed by uncontrollable clapping and laughing. Jim was undaunted, as this is a typical response when I’m really excited. I had him stop the car for a photo-op of the bridge, with the Cullin mountains in the background. Beautiful view! I still remember the awe of seeing it for the first time. The drive from Glasgow through the rugged landscape of western Scotland was fantastic, but the Isle of Skye was truly breathtaking.

With camera in hand we continued across the bridge and looked for Saucy Mary’s. Now here’s where my fairy tale trip took its first detour. (Cue impending doom music.) It was 8:05 when we pulled into the car park at the pub. We walked in and took a seat. I was doing the silent clap and giggle so as not to draw too much attention to myself. Someone said we had to order at the bar, so we walked over and asked for fish and chips. DENIED! The kitchen had closed at 8:00. (The cook had just left the building.) Are you kidding me? I wanted to scream, “I just flew over an OCEAN, and drove (technically Jim drove, but you get the point) for five hours to eat fish and chips at Saucy Mary’s for our first meal on Skye!” Instead we asked where we could find a place to eat. Jim was really hungry! It was Sunday evening, and as Skye is very Presbyterian, lots of places were closed on Sundays. They suggested the Indian Restaurant just up the road, as they are not Presbyterian. Now this is where I tell you how much I do not like Indian food. And it just seemed wrong on so many levels to eat it as our first meal on Skye. But alas, it’s what we did. We paid fifty dollars for some really, really bad Indian food. I’ve heard there are lots of great Indian dishes. We evidently did not choose any of these.

Image

(Peter and Jane Macdonald’s Bed and Breakfast, Sleat, Isle of Skye, Scotland. Photo by the Hales.)

Well anyway after let’s call it “dinner,” we drove to our bed and breakfast. Tired and hungry. But when we arrived and met the Macdonalds and saw the beautiful view of the Sound of Sleat with the Hills of Knoydart in the background, the fairy tale took a turn for the better.

As I lay in bed that night my mind would not rest. It was off on all kinds of adventures, searching for a stone manor, lost ancestors, and a faerie or two.

Read Full Post »

Skye Day One 08 066

(Waterfall in the gardens of Dunvegan Castle, Isle of Skye, Scotland. Photo by Jim and Terri Hale)

I love waterfalls. Always have. I love the sound they make, the roar of the waters crashing over the rocks, the mist that fills the air and kisses my skin, the wonder of what might be hiding inside the mountain underneath the falls. This wonder led to a chapter in my novel. I have woven a tale of Skye in the 1740s throughout the contemporary story. This scene takes place in this backstory. Alexander and Mari, two young lovers, ride through the Druid Wood near Uig. Alexander is taking her to a secret place. Secret because few people ever venture into this enchanted wood. He asks her to close her eyes as they reach a clearing. As she steps out of the trees he tells her to look.

Mari squinted as the brightness of the sun flooded her eyes. She lifted her hand to her brow and sheltered it. Her mouth fell open, and she let out a tiny gasp as she walked forward, dropping her grip on Alexander’s arm. Before her lay a beautiful waterfall, surrounded by green ferns and wildflowers. Wild purple rhododendrons bloomed along a path that led to a cave opening beside the waterfall. At the base of the falls was a wee loch, clear and deep. The water was a beautiful shade of turquoise.

Alexander walked up behind her and whispered. “There is someone I’d like you to meet.”

Image

(Waterfall with ancient Roman bridge near Loch Tay, Scotland. Photo by Jim and Terri Hale)

Waterfalls can evoke a myriad of emotions. Giant falls suggest great power, cleansing, redemption even. Smaller falls can lead to more tranquil feelings, bringing about more contemplative thoughts. All falls are romantic! The photo above was taken while on our first family trip to Scotland. We were camping near Loch Tay, and a local told us about several things that were MUST SEE in the area. These, he said, were not necessarily to be found in our travel guides. So we were all in! We found the oldest Yew tree in the UK, Macgregor’s Leap, and this beautiful Roman Bridge complete with an enchanted waterfall. I was sure that the stone manor I’d dreamed of would be just down the road. We drove, and drove, and drove. However, no stone manor. I’m still looking!

Image

(Small waterfall on the roadside in Sleat, Isle of Skye, Scotland. Photo by Jim and Terri Hale)

While thinking about writing this post, I wondered if there might be a link between waterfalls and dragons. (In light of  my ongoing quest.) THERE IS! I found this wonderful Chinese lore about the Dragon’s Gate. Legend has it that carp (and in Japanese stories koi) will find their way to a waterfall and attempt to swim/climb/jump to the top. Those few who make it turn into dragons. Not our scary Western dragons, but powerful, magical, beautiful Eastern Dragons! Symbols of perseverance, strength, wisdom. In fact, in China when scholars passed their literary exams they were said to have “passed thru the Dragon’s Gate.” Love it!

We’ve all heard or read stories of people attempting to go OVER the falls and survive. I believe those that are truly brave and strong are the ones who start at the base and make their way to top!

I often feel like I’m swimming upstream. I tire when I focus on the current I’m battling against and lose sight of my ultimate destination. Of course, in my mind I’m imagining a peaceful pool at the end of the struggle, crystal clear waters…no fish to nip at my legs or snakes to slither toward me. However, it appears there is, in fact, a raging waterfall at the end. (Of course!) In the past few months I feel like I’ve made it to the falls, where I’ve been attempting in my own meager way to jump to the top. However, when I step back and consider what lies ahead, I know when the time comes I will have the strength I need to make it to the top of the falls and become a DRAGON. No riding, no slaying, only becoming!

Image

(Small falls on Isle of Skye, Scotland. Photo by Terri Hale)

I’ve found a secret path to the top. I can’t make it there in my own strength. I’ve taken hold of my Creator’s hand, and together we will climb to the top of the falls, where I imagine myself becoming a beautiful turquoise dragon…with wings, of course. Oh, and fire-breathing. That might come in handy.

Read Full Post »

Image

(Faerie Glen with wee loch, portal to the Otherworld, and Castle on Isle of Skye, Scotland. Photo by Jim Hale)

While writing my novel, I searched the internet for photos of the Isle of Skye. I’d never been there, and since it was the main setting for “The Stone Manor” I needed to find out all I could about the island. I came across a couple of pictures of the Faerie Glen and a short travel post. I was hooked! I googled it and began reading all I could about it, which at the time wasn’t much. It became the focal point for my back story that takes place in the 1700s.

I’ll never forget the feelings I had when we first drove into the wee glen with our personal tour guide, Peter Macdonald. It was 2008, and my husband Jim and I were spending a week on Skye so I could research my ancestors and check out all the places I’d written about in my novel. Like the actual time it took to drive from the Glasgow airport to Skye. Did I guess correctly? And did it really look like I said? That kind of thing. I’ll elaborate on this more in a later post. Lots of craziness happened. Anyway, back to the Faerie Glen. Peter didn’t normally take people there. In fact, I had to tell him how to get there…and that wasn’t easy. It was tucked away down a one-track road just outside Uig. He humored me and we found the road. As we rounded the corner there it was!!!!! I gasped and yelled, “Stop the car. Stop the car.” He did. I jumped out  and stood next to the miniature loch, crying and laughing at the same time. It was MAGICAL. It was BEAUTIFUL. It was ENCHANTED. And I was there!

Image

(Me walking along the sheep trails in the Faerie Glen, Isle of Skye, Scotland. Photo by Jim Hale)

As I wandered off up the hillside toward the Portal to the Otherworld and the Faerie Castle, Jim tried to explain to Peter (a former police officer/faithful Presbyterian Skyelander) that I was off in search of the faeires. After a short visit in the glen I made my way back to the car, and Jim promised we’d return and stay as long as I’d like. When we did return several days later I wandered and searched and dreamed to my hearts content. It was glorious. Really! As we were leaving I picked up a tiny stone from the loch, as I am in the habit of doing. (I have a collection of memory stones from around the world. Doesn’t everyone?) But as I climbed into the front seat of our rental car I remembered what I’d read. It had to do with taking things from this faerie land. I even wrote about it in my novel. How could I have forgotten?! If you take anything…anything at all from the Faerie Glen you’ll bring very, very bad luck on yourself. The faeries will not take kindly to it. Not at all. So I got back out of the car and returned the stone to the loch, placing it exactly where I’d found it. I apologized and walked back to the car. (I’m serious people.) I was really sad not to take a part of this amazing place back home with me, but I just couldn’t. As I reopened the car door I looked down and on the ground by the car was a coin. I smiled. I picked it up. I thanked the glen…and the faeries for the gift. This did not belong in the glen, so it was a compromise of sorts. I still have the coin. It sits in the coconut-hull bowl filled with all my tiny treasures from the many places that are special to me.

So, there it is. Just as you’ve always suspected. I’m a bit of a nut. Actually, I’m a romantic…a romantic with a universe size imagination and a love for all things enchanted. Which is why I wrote my very own fairy tale. And someday, I hope you’ll be able to read it. Till then, I’ll keep blogging.

Read Full Post »

Image

(Dad and me, in 1974, in the Chilean Andes outside Santiago.)

My dad commented yesterday, Father’s Day, how great it was to share “the dream” with me. Let me explain. The recurring dream I have about the stone manor is evidently an “ancestral memory.” Don’t mean to sound creepy or heretical. Just stating the facts, ma’am. Besides many of you know how much I love faeries, fantasy, AND if I could have only one Super Power it would be flying!

Back to the dream. I was watching a Discovery Channel program a few years ago with Dad about Scotland. There was a beautiful one-track road with breath-taking views surrounding it, and Dad made the comment that it looked a bit like a dream he’s had for years. He began describing it, and I told him I’d had the exact same dream, beginning when I was eighteen years old. Crazy, we thought. Then later, I was in the car with my husband and our three sons, and I began to tell them about the dream and before I could explain what it was about our eldest son, Trevor, said, “You mean the one about the castle? Well, it’s not really a castle more like a great stone manor.” He was eighteen. He’d had the SAME dream. Can we all just let out a big CRAZY SCREAM right now? (Thanks for that.) Anyway, this dream helped form the main  “magical” element of my novel.

We took a trip to Scotland in 2002 with our three boys, all teenagers, and spent some of that time looking for the “dream” manor. No luck. We DO have a lovely daughter, but she was married and did not make this trip with us. Another time!

When I found ancestors from the Isle of Skye, I was elated. The fact that they’re on my mother’s side did not dissuade me. I KNOW my dad has ancestors from south-western England, Ireland, and Scotland. Somewhere there is a stone manor, and someday I will find it! In the meantime, I’m borrowing my mother’s ancestors, the Macdonalds, who immigrated to America around 1774 from Skye and grafting them into the stone manor dream. Sometimes I forget I’ve mixed the two. Like when Jim and I spent a week in Skye in 2008, researching for my novel. I was actually looking for the manor. Hey, it could happen!

A couple of years ago, my husband graciously agreed to accompany me on a search to the far south-western edge of Wales to look for a stone castle where one of my dad’s ancestors had lived. It had been described as a Fortified Manor House. Hmm. Could this be the one? It was awesome! We drove up in the rain, which is the only way one should see a castle in ruins in Wales. Alas, it was not our dream manor, but will make for a great setting in another novel.

Image

(Weoley Castle, Southwestern Wales. Photo by Jim Hale)

My dad is a STORYTELLER in the truest sense of the word. I’ve inherited this from him, and I am grateful. I love you Dad. Thanks for the FANTASTIC heritage.

Read Full Post »

Image

(Photo above: Armadale Castle, Sleat, Isle of Skye, Scotland. Photo taken by Jim Hale)

I’ve written a novel. It began as a dream, which turned into an idea, which found its way into words in a short story April 14, 2006. Lady of the Glen, as it was called then, was 3,800 words short and an assignment for my second Creative Fiction class at Stephen F. Austin State University in Nacogdoches, Texas. Dr. John McDermott was my first ever writing professor, now good friend. In the Fall of 2006, I took a Fantasy and Magic Realism class from John’s wife, Dr. Christine Butterworth-McDermott. my second ever writing professor, now good friend. By November, Lady of the Glen had grown to 5,700 words and Christine planted the seed that this could be something bigger. A novel. I’d never seriously considered writing a novel. I continued working on the story and expanding it. Spring 2007 found me in my fourth Creative Writing class with Writer-in-Residence, Joe Lansdale teaching. He continued to encourage me to pursue writing seriously and helped with the “business” end of the craft. I am forever indebted to these three amazing writers. I decided this was a dragon worth riding. It’s been a LONG HARD ride, but well worth it. I’ve loved almost every minute of it. Apart from the dreaded query letters and synopsis. My novel now stands at 81,000 words and is titled The Stone Manor. It’s Women’s Fiction with strong elements of romance and magic realism. I think my favorite part about this novel is it’s based on a dream I had. A recurring dream that began when I was eighteen years old…of a stone manor. As I started to write this novel, I decided to search for ancestors in Scotland. I’d heard we had lots of Scots blood on both sides, and I just knew the manor of my dream was somewhere in the Highlands. I’ll never forget the day I was researching on Ancestors.com and hit the jackpot. Macdonalds from the Isle of Skye! I screamed out-loud. The plot thickened and characters were born. A trip to Skye followed. But I’ll save that for another post…another day.

Read Full Post »

terribleminds: chuck wendig

Chuck Wendig: Freelance Penmonkey

Terri Hale Books

Writing About Fiction, Travel, and Life

Photography memoirs

Fine Art Photography

RuthieDean.com

a dose of truth. a choice for joy. life abundant.

brentamywolff

This is as real as it gets!

VIEW FROM THE BLUFF

by Bill Sherrill

joulesevans

Occasionally radioactive with a chance of superpowers. I use them to fight cancer. Also I write.